Forget the June gloom, better weather is coming to Burns Lake

While June may have been a dismal month in the Northern Interior, July and August are set to be closer to normal temperatures.

Like the lyrics to the classic song Happy days are here again... So long sad times

Like the lyrics to the classic song Happy days are here again... So long sad times

Warmer weather is on the horizon for the local area.

That’s the weather prediction made by David Phillips, senior climatologist for Environment Canada.

Phillips said that while June may have been a dismal month in the Northern Interior, July and August are set to be closer to normal temperatures.

“The June gloom will break and things are beginning to look up and be more summer like as the weeks go on,” he said.

Phillips said it has been a very cool spring in Burns Lake, with persistently cool weather. “March was much cooler than normal,” he said.

While he said many people in British Columbia are complaining about the wet weather, there hasn’t been too much precipitation, although there has been a lot of days with rain.

“The precipitation levels have been normal, but there has been an increase in the amount of days that have had rain. When there has been a nice day, it has also usually included some rain. It has been a slow beginning to summer and more overcast that usual … the weather hasn’t been that pleasant,” he added.

Phillips said the cooler weather has extended beyond the first day of summer which has people wondering if summer is going to come and go this year without warm weather.

Normal temperatures for this time of year are typically around 20 degrees Celsius, however Phillips said the Burns Lake area has been three to five degrees cooler than usual.

“I know it doesn’t look like summer is going to arrive, but we should forget June and keep our fingers crossed for July and August,” he said, adding that current predications are looking good.

“Near normal temperatures probably sound pretty inviting to people in the Northern Interior and it looks like temperatures will be near normal for July and while precipitation levels are harder to predict, it looks like it will be dryer than normal … the weather is beginning to look up for Burns Lake,” Phillips added.

The Environment Canada almanac shows that the highest temperature to hit the Burns Lake in June, was an extreme maximum of 33.3 degrees Celsius on June 13, 1969, while the coldest June day was an extreme minimum recorded on June 10, 1973, of minus 2.2 degrees Celsius.