God votes for you

With the presidential election in the U.S. coming soon, each candidate is giving reasons why voting for them will produce the best results.

  • Oct. 17, 2012 11:00 a.m.

With the presidential election in the U.S. coming soon, each candidate is giving reasons why voting for them will produce the best results.

For 2000 years Jesus has been campaigning that he is going to establish a righteous kingdom upon earth.  What are his promises?  He will judge righteously, produce peace among nations, and end terrorism.  Lions will dwell with lambs; cows and bears feed together; nursing children will play with once-poisonous vipers like toys; death and disease will be nonexistent.  Nothing shall hurt or destroy in his holy mountain.  To sum it all up, the Bible declares, “His rest shall be glorious.”

However, peace is the exclusive fruit of righteousness.  No individual or nation will experience peace until there is “rightness” within.  For this reason, the things that corrupt our nations now will be exempt in God’s Kingdom.  The Bible says, “Let no one deceive you in any way, no one who is sexually immoral, no murderers, no thieves, no covetous, no drunkards or drug-abusers, no liars, or extortionists, shall inherit the kingdom of God.”

Since this list would exclude every one of us, the Bible continues, “And such were some of you, but now you are washed by the blood of Christ, and set apart to live righteously by the help and power of God’s Spirit.  You are completely justified in the name of Jesus Christ.”

No one can say they are too ‘bad’ to enter the Kingdom of Heaven, for Christ has paid for them in full.  No one can say they are good enough on their own merit to enter the kingdom of heaven.  We are all sinners who would be equally exempt were it not for the loving payment of Christ.  But each one of us must place our vote as to where we want to spend eternity.

Remember, God votes for you, the devil votes against you, but your vote decides the election.

 

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