Jason Prince (R)

Jason Prince (R)

Burns Lake First Nations partner to create opportunities

New provincial funding has allowed four First Nations groups in the Burns Lake area to create partnerships

New provincial funding has allowed four First Nations groups in the Burns Lake area to create partnerships that will provide new educational opportunities for their members.

The Burns Lake Band and the Wet’suwet’en First Nation are building on the success of an earlier skills training program, the Nis Ts’edilh (we are moving forward).

Up to 86 community members will receive training through the project.

Nis Ts’edilh (we are moving forward) is a joint skills training project with courses that include customer service, warehouse training, program management, office administration and computer technology, adult literacy and maintenance worker program.

The provincial government is providing funding of $430,000 for this program.

“Through strong leadership and strategic partnerships such as the Nis Ts’edilh (we are moving forward), the 147-member Burns Lake Band is in the process of finalizing its hotel Keyoh Lodge employing several people,” said Burns Lake Band Chief Dan George. “One of the training opportunities, the customer care program will assist our membership with the skills required to operate the band owned business.”

The Skin Tyee First Nation and Nee Tahi Buhn Band have also launched a job skills training project that will provide up to 50 community members with increased opportunities for employment and apprenticeships.

The project has a strong focus on foundational training, trades career exploration and safety certificates that will help to prepare participants for successful transition to college-level trades training and apprenticeships.

Training courses include land stewardship, hospitality, food service, carpentry apprenticeship, plumbing apprenticeship, electrical apprenticeship and trades discovery program.

The provincial government is providing funding of $300,000 for this skills training project.

“I am encouraged to see the province is committed to funding our communities in the training of our members in meaningful, transferable skills for the second year,” said Skin Tyee First Nation Chief Rene Skin. “As a result, we look forward to trained individuals that will be guardians of the land and employable individuals in the hospitality and trades sectors.”

Offering community-driven skills training is one part of the province’s efforts to include First Nations communities and Aboriginal people in new LNG sector opportunities.

The province is also working with First Nations communities on environmental stewardship priorities and financial benefits agreements.

“Supporting work-related training that leads to good, sustainable jobs

is a priority for our government and this project will open doors to career opportunities,” said John Rustad, Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation.