The fire ban for the Northwest Fire Centre’s jurisdiction will begin on Friday, May 24 at noon. (BC Wildfire Service Photo)

Fire ban back in effect for Northwest Fire Centre region

Starting May 24, both Category 2 and Category 3 prohibitions will be in place

BC Wildfire Services has announced a fire ban will be back in effect throughout the Northwest Fire Centre’s jurisdiction on Friday, May 24 at noon.

In an effort to reduce wildfire risks, the Category 2 fire prohibition for the Nadina, Bulkley and Skeena fire zones will prohibit any fires larger than a campfire, the burning of grass in an area less than 0.2 hectares and one or two concurrently burning piles that are no bigger than two metres wide by two metres high.

The Cassiar Fire Zone, which extends to the Yukon border north of Stewart and Bell II, has been issued a Category 3 fire ban.

This includes all open fires, such as campfires, industrial and backyard burning, outdoor stoves and other portable campfire apparatuses that are not CSA or ULC approved, and binary exploding targets (ex. rifle used for target practices).

Fireworks, firecrackers, tiki torches, sky lanterns, and chimineas are also not allowed.

READ MORE: B.C. sends 267 firefighters to help battle Alberta wildfires

“Anyone found in contravention of an open fire prohibition may be issued a ticket for $1,150, required to pay an administrative penalty of $10,000, or, if convicted in court, fined up to $100,000 and/or sentenced to one year in prison,” reads the press release. “If the contravention causes or contributes to a wildfire, the person responsible may be ordered to pay all firefighting and associated costs.”

The prohibitions apply to all public and private land unless specified otherwise.

Any burn registration number holders, who may already have piles burning, will be asked to let them burn out. New burn registration numbers will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

This ban will remain in place until the public is notified.


 


natalia@terracestandard.com

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