‘I think he’s still alive’: B.C. mom pleads for help finding son last seen a month ago

Family offering $5,000 reward for information leading to the safe return of Tim Delahaye

While choking back tears this week, Cathy Delahaye pleaded for any tips, any information, anything anyone might know about her missing son.

Timothy Marc Delahaye, 29, of North Vancouver was last seen on April 29 by a friend who dropped him off on Frost Road in the Columbia Valley south of Cultus Lake.

Cathy said Tim was on his way to a Buddhist retreat in Washington State, a place he visited last year as well. This year he wanted to spend some time in nature first.

“His behaviour is not like this at all,” Cathy said visiting the office of The Progress after canvassing neighbours in the Columbia Valley. “On Mother’s Day he didn’t call me. It’s not normal. We were very close. There’s something wrong but I think I still hear his heart. I think he’s still alive. I think he is hurt or lost.”

RCMP issued a press release on May 21 about Delahaye being missing.

• READ MORE: Missing man last seen near Cultus Lake may have walked into the U.S.

Chilliwack RCMP spokesperson Cpl. Mike Rail said on May 24 that the case is being taken seriously.

“We are conducting an extensive investigation,” he said. “Part of it is the search, and the area has been searched thoroughly.”

Chilliwack Search and Rescue (CSAR) search manager Doug Fraser said his team was tasked with searching the area, which they did on Sunday and Monday, but no sign of anyone hiking or camping were found.

“Most of the area in the Columbia Valley is privately owned so there is very little public/Crown land to search,” Fraser explained.

The area in question is also mountainous and dense bush and with no clue as to exactly what his plans were, CSAR had little to go on.

The Whatcom County Sheriff’s Office is also aware of Timothy’s missing status and the fact that he may have wandered over the border.

The spot in the Columbia Valley near Frost Road south of Cultus Lake, which is south of Chilliwack, where George Snelgrove said he saw a tent on the day Tim Delahaye was dropped off by a friend on April 29. He has not been seen since then.

Frost Road residents George and Babs Snelgrove told Cathy they think me might have camped near their house. George told The Progress that he saw a large tent on a landing on an old clearcut the day he was supposedly dropped off in the Columbia Valley.

George hiked up there recently but could find no evidence of a trail or even that he had camped in the area.

Cathy is desperate to get her son back. Tim is the ninth of nine children, and she said he is not a criminal or a drug user or even a drinker.

“He’s just such a super simple, sweet guy,” she said. “He’s just such a peaceful guy.”

The family has now offered a $5,000 reward for information leading to his safe return with the hope that someone might know something but hasn’t yet come forward.

His sister Joan Wolf posted about the reward on her Facebook page on May 22.

“We are all very concerned about him,” Cathy said. “What would you do if it was your son. I want someone every day out there looking.”

Timothy Marc Delahaye is described as a Caucasian male; height 193 centimetres (6’4”) with a slim build, with reddish-brown hair and blue-green eyes.

He was last seen wearing a dark blue jacket, turquoise shirt, and green pants.

Anyone with information on the whereabouts of Timothy Marc Delahaye is urged to contact their local police agency or, to remain anonymous, call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS).


@PeeJayAitch
paul.henderson@theprogress.com

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The spot in the Columbia Valley near Frost Road south of Cultus Lake, which is south of Chilliwack, where George Snelgrove said he saw a tent on the day Tim Delahaye was dropped off by a friend on April 29. He has not been seen since then.

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