Conservation officers responded to a similar complaint in Smithers approximately a month ago. The three foot long python was captured by conservation officers and transferred to protective custody.

Conservation officers responded to a similar complaint in Smithers approximately a month ago. The three foot long python was captured by conservation officers and transferred to protective custody.

Reports of a lost python sighted in Burns Lake area

The Ministry of Environment in Burns Lake recently received a complaint regarding a lost python in Burns Lake.

The Ministry of Environment in Burns Lake recently received a complaint regarding a lost python in Burns Lake.

Phone calls from concerned Burns Lakers noted that a large snake had been seen lurking on Center Street, but no confirmed sightings have been reported yet.

Jeff Palm, Conservation Officer for the Ministry of Environment said that if the snake is a small specimen that the snake would pose very little risk to humans.

“Small pythons pose very little risk to humans, since they are not venomous,” Palm said. “however, very large specimens can be dangerous.”

According to Palm, all pythons are constrictors and typically eat rodents, capturing them by grasping, coiling and swallowing the animal whole.

British Columbia has enacted legislation restricting the possession of all pythons over three metres (nine feet) in length, for the reasons listed above.

Conservation officers responded to a similar complaint in Smithers approximately a month ago. The three foot long python was captured by conservation officers and transferred to protective custody.

Palm said that the public is encouraged to report any human wildlife conflict to the Conservation Officer Service hotline.

The hotline number is 1-866-952-7277.