Run, hide, fight — surviving an active shooter situation

A former Kelowna cop teaches how to survive an active shooter situation

You may think a mass shooting is an unlikely event in your corner of the world, but a former Kelowna RCMP officer, who operates a safety consultancy business, says that’s not the case — we all need to become more aware of how to protect ourselves.

Mass shootings are happening in big, small, rural and urban areas, explains Sam Ghadban of Great Circle Consulting. Active shooters target malls, schools and places of worship — nowhere is safe.

The recent shooting in the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, where 26 people were killed and 50 injured, happened in a town of 500. It’s exactly the type of place, Ghadban said, where nobody thought it would happen.

That’s why this program is important.

“People should be taking this and teaching it to their kids,” he said. It’s not to scare anybody, but …. a healthy dose of situational awareness is important.”

Ghadban said the first thing to remember is to go into every situation knowing where exut points and evacuation routes are.

Then, if the worst happens, remember “run, hide, fight.”

RELATED: 58 killed in mass shooting in Las Vegas

These three words may seem simple, but if they’re regularly considered it’s more likely the worst will be averted if and when the time of an active shooter situation arises.

“The first thing people typically do is that they want to hide and you don’t want to do that,” he said. “You don’t want to go through a cognitive process.”

If there is no clear route to escape the situation then hide.

Move into rooms where you’re able to barricade yourself and others from the attacker.

RELATED: Worst shooting in US history, 49 victims in Orlando Florida

Then fight. If the attacker breaches that room, be ready to use an improvised weapon — fire extinguisher, chair, pen, scissors — and commit to a fight.

Follow this story a more in depth report on the interview with Ghadban.

To report a typo, email: edit@kelownacapnews.com.



kmichaels@kelownacapnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

UPDATE: CN train derailment cleared between Terrace and Prince Rupert

The CN mainline is now open, following a train derailment mid-way between… Continue reading

Trial finishes for suspect in Burns Lake man’s murder

Closing submissions concluded at the Supreme Court in Prince George on July… Continue reading

Lightning starts nine small fires on July 5-7

Several wildfires started in the Northwest Fire Centre region over the July… Continue reading

Mill blast safety measures review ends

The government is wrapping up a review on how industries and other… Continue reading

Magician wows Burns Lake children

Magician Leif David entertained dozens of children in the Burns Lake Public… Continue reading

Fashion Fridays: 5 casual summer dress styles

Kim XO, helps to keep you looking good on Fashion Fridays on the Black Press Media Network

Bank of Canada lowers qualifying rate used in mortgage stress tests

Home sales softened last year after the federal government introduced new stress test rules for uninsured mortgages

Couple found dead along northern B.C. highway in double homicide

Woman from the U.S. and man from Australia found dead near Liard Hot Springs

B.C. man pleads guilty in snake venom death of toddler

Plea comes more than five years after the incident in North Vancouver

Trudeau says Ottawa open to proposals for B.C. refinery as gas prices soar

Prime minister says he knows B.C. residents are struggling and the federal government is open to ideas

Clock’s ticking to share how you feel about Daylight Saving Time in B.C.

Provincial public survey ends at 4 p.m. on Friday

B.C. First Nation’s group using ads in Texas targeting company for fuel spill

The Heiltsuk Tribal Council has called out Kirby Corporation for the Nathan E. Stewart oil spill

B.C. woman wins record $2.1 million on casino slot machine

‘That night was so surreal … I wasn’t able to sleep or eat for the first two days,’ she said

After B.C. dad’s death, Technical Safety BC wants changes to trampoline park rules

Jay Greenwood, 46, did ‘a series of acrobatic manoeuvres prior to a fall that caused serious injury and cardiac arrest’

Most Read