Premier John Horgan during a 2018 meeting with Washington Gov. Jay Inslee. (Black Press Media file)

Should B.C. get rid of Daylight Saving Time?

The province wants to know, as state governments down south make the move

Shall B.C. forever “spring forward” and “fall back”?

That is the question at the heart of a provincial survey open to the public until July 19.

“As our neighbours in the western United States move toward permanent daylight saving time, it’s a good time to think about what will work best for British Columbia,” said Premier John Horgan in a news release on Monday. “I invite people to consider our options and take part in an online survey that will help us decide whether to leave things as they are or if it’s time to make a change.”

RELATED: B.C. offers to work with U.S. states on daylight saving time

The survey includes information on B.C.’s history of time observance and the impact of various options, such as changes to the timing of sunrise and sunset at different times of year and the impact on industries such as agriculture and transportation.

The survey takes about five minutes to complete. Residents can also submit written submissions.

Horgan has said he has written to the governors of California, Oregon and Washington, where legislators are considering bills that would seek an exemption from U.S. federal law so they can opt out of turning the clocks back an hour each fall and then ahead in the spring.

READ MORE: B.C. MLA calls for daylight saving time to stay

ONLINE POLL: Would you like to move away from time changes?

The premier has described the seasonal time change as the number one issue over which the public has contacted him since taking the job in 2017.


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