B.C.’s construction industry is now overwhelmingly non-union and open-shop. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)

B.C.’s construction industry is now overwhelmingly non-union and open-shop. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)

B.C. VIEWS: NDP’s construction rebuild showing some big cracks

Highway cost overruns have just begun under U.S. union deal

The first highway construction job under the B.C. NDP government’s Orwellian “community benefits agreement” has been awarded, and it is one whopping steak-and-six-salads lunch for the U.S.-based unions so revered by Premier John Horgan.

For a mere two kilometres of four-laning the Trans Canada Highway near Revelstoke, the cost soared 35 per cent in three months. That’s a jump of more than $22 million above a budget of $63 million that was announced when bids were invited in February.

The NDP government slipped this past the Vancouver media, burying it in a news release put out just before the May long weekend. It was immediately brought to my attention by a representative of the Christian Labour Association of Canada (CLAC), the primary target of the Horgan government’s pact with the B.C. and Yukon Building Trades Council.

These guys go by such up-to-date names as the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders, Blacksmiths, Forgers and Helpers Lodge 359. There are 19 of them, anointed by the Horgan government as fit for taxpayer-funded construction, starting with the Pattullo Bridge replacement, the Broadway subway and a half dozen sections of the Trans Canada Highway between Kamloops and the Alberta border.

Also chosen is “Move Up,” formerly COPE 378, the B.C. Hydro office union and a key supplier of staff to the premier’s office.

Their monopoly on public construction is filled and chilled like the salad table required on a highway job. But they had a bitter setback last week when the B.C. Green Party rose up to defeat a key part of the NDP’s labour code revisions, the one that allowed construction union raids every summer.

Labour Minister Harry Bains adopted stabilizing rules that allow raids only after a union contract has been in place for three years. Except for construction.

Horgan attended a B.C. Building Trades convention in Victoria last year, and it was like a religious rally. He and executive director Tom Sigurdson congratulated each other for the huge benefit their monopoly would have for apprentices.

That fiction was shredded last week by the Independent Contractors and Business Association (ICBA), which compiled the B.C. government’s own statistics on apprenticeships. A lot has changed since the Hyundai-Kerkhoff consortium built the Alex Fraser Bridge in the 1980s, the first non-union heavy construction in B.C. CLAC workers and affiliated contractors have since worked on the new Port Mann Bridge and are gearing up for pipeline work.

RELATED: Vancouver Island interchange project continues into 2020

RELATED: Cost jumps 35% on Trans Canada Highway widening job

The B.C. government’s Industry Training Authority reports that of the 28,432 registered construction apprentices in B.C., 23,172 are sponsored by open-shop companies, not unions. That’s three out of four.

ICBA president Chris Gardner notes that in some trades, the ratio is even higher. Apprentice welders are 96 per cent open-shop, plumbers 87 per cent, carpenters 85 per cent, electricians 83 per cent.

“Over the past 35 years, the building trades unions have lost market share, lost any wage and benefit advantage they used to have, and alienated generations of B.C. construction workers,” Gardner said.

One of those disaffected construction workers is carpenter Zig van Akker, who worked on the Island Highway project in the 1990s, the last NDP-building trades road job. He remembers the strict craft lines and having to sue a union pension fund.

Commuters on that highway are being held up these days by overpass construction north of Victoria. It’s finally being built after 1990s union featherbedding caused it to be downgraded to a traffic light.

Tom Fletcher is B.C. legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press Media. Email: tfletcher@blackpress.ca


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

BC legislature

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

The COVID-19 outbreak at the two Coastal GasLink workforce lodges has officially been declared over. (Lakes District News file photo)
COVID-19 outbreak at Coastal GasLink worksites declared over

In total, 56 cases were associated with the outbreak in the Burns Lake and Nechako LHAs

Brett Alexander Jones is wanted on several warrants province-wide, in connection with multiple charges. Jan. 21, 2021. Kitimat RCMP photo
Kitimat RCMP searching for man wanted on several warrants province-wide

Jones is described as a five-foot 10-inches Caucasian man, with blond hair and blue eyes.

Lake Babine Nation closure sign
Lake Babine Nation issues COVID numbers update

Urges members to follow provincial health orders

NH representative confirmed that people who received their first dose will be scheduled to receive their second dose within the recommended timeframe.(The Canadian Press/Nathan Denette photo)
Vaccine rollout abruptly halted in Lakes District

Northern Health cites Pfizer shipment delays for the vaccine distribution disruption

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders sits in on a COVID-19 briefing with Dr. Bonnie Henry, provincial health officer, and Adrian Dix, B.C. minister of health. (Birinder Narang/Twitter)
PHOTOS: Bernie Sanders visits B.C. landmarks through the magic of photo editing

Residents jump on viral trend of photoshopping U.S. senator into images

A 75-year-old aircraft has been languishing in a parking lot on the campus of the University of the Fraser Valley, but will soon be moved to the B.C. Aviation Museum. (Paul Henderson/ Chilliwack Progress)
Vintage military aircraft moving from Chilliwack to new home at B.C. Aviation Museum

The challenging move to Vancouver Island will be documented by Discovery Channel film crews

A video posted to social media by Chilliwack resident Rob Iezzi shows a teenager getting kicked in the face after being approached by three suspects on Friday, Jan. 22, 2021. (YouTube/Rob i)
VIDEO: Security cameras capture ‘just one more assault’ near B.C. high school

Third high-school related assault captured by Chilliwack resident’s cameras since beginning of 2021

FILE - In this Feb. 14, 2017, file photo, Oklahoma State Rep. Justin Humphrey prepares to speak at the State Capitol in Oklahoma City. A mythical, ape-like creature that has captured the imagination of adventurers for decades has now become the target of Rep. Justin Humphrey. Humphrey, a Republican House member has introduced a bill that would create a Bigfoot hunting season, He says issuing a state hunting license and tag could help boost tourism. (Steve Gooch/The Oklahoman via AP, File)
Oklahoma lawmaker proposes ‘Bigfoot’ hunting season

A Republican House member has introduced a bill that would create a Bigfoot hunting season

Economic Development and Official Languages Minister Melanie Joly responds to a question in the House of Commons Monday November 23, 2020 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Federal minister touts need for new B.C. economic development agency

Last December’s federal economic update promised a stimulus package of about $100 billion this year

FILE - In this Nov. 20, 2017, file photo, Larry King attends the 45th International Emmy Awards at the New York Hilton, in New York. Former CNN talk show host King has been hospitalized with COVID-19 for more than a week, the news channel reported Saturday, Jan. 2, 2021. CNN reported the 87-year-old King contracted the coronavirus and was undergoing treatment at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP, File)
Larry King, broadcasting giant for half-century, dies at 87

King conducted an estimated 50,000 on-air interviews

BC Coroners Service is currently investigating a death at Canoe Cove Marina and Boatyard in North Saanich. (Black Press Media File)
Drowning death in North Saanich likely B.C.’s first in for 2021

Investigation into suspected drowning Monday night continues

Kimberly Proctor, 18, was murdered in 2010. Her family has spent many of the years since pushing for a law in her honour, that they say would help to prevent similar tragedies. (Courtesy of Jo-Anne Landolt)
Proposed law honouring murdered B.C. teen at a standstill, lacks government support

Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions has concerns with involuntary detainment portion of act

Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam speaks during a daily briefing in Ottawa. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld)
31 cases of COVID-19 variants detected in Canada: Health officials

Dr. Theresa Tam made announces 13 more variant COVID-19 cases in Canada

Most Read