Winter games provide economic boost

Organizers have released their final economic impact report from the 2015 Canada Winter Games, and it's even better than expected.

Organizers have released their final economic impact report from the 2015 Canada Winter Games, and it’s even better than expected.

The host society found that total economic activity generated by the games accounted for $123.4 million in British Columbia and $83.2  million in the Prince George area alone. Those numbers are  substantially above the pre-games estimate of between $70 million and  $90 million in economic activity.

Other successes realized at the games include ticket sales and attendance. More than 10,500 visitors came to Prince George to  participate in or watch the games, and 4,800 volunteers came together from across B.C. to support the 18-day, multi-sport event.

Why It Matters:

The 2015 Canada Winter Games hosted in Prince George were the largest multi-sport competition and first Winter Games to be held in the province. The games were a success from both a technical and organizational standpoint, and received tremendous support from local residents and visitors. They also left behind a considerable infrastructure legacy in Prince George, with nearly $20 million of capital investments as a result of hosting the games.

Quick Facts:

• The Government of British Columbia invested $12.8 million in the 2015 Canada Winter Games.

• The Canada Games began in 1967. They are held every two years, alternating between Summer and Winter Games.

• Previous Canada Games held in B.C. include the 1973 Summer Games  (New Westminster/Burnaby) and 1993 Summer Games (Kamloops).

• The 2015 Canada Winter Games were awarded to Prince George on Sept. 17, 2010.

• Lheidli T’enneh was the Official Host First Nation – the first in the history of the Canada Games.